So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:
Almond butter on some crackers (before run). English muffin with almond butter (after run). About six glasses of Lipton Iced Tea.
Lunch:
Mac and Cheese. A hefty portion of Comte cheese on crackers. Cherries.
Dinner:
Chips and salsa. Black bean nachos. House margarita with ice and salt.


Morning ➛
I woke up at 6am and read for about a half hour from Daring Greatly and a business book. Then, I spent some time reflecting on my day. The intention is to do this for about 15 minutes, but lately - like today - it’s more like five minutes. After the reading my husband and I walked our puppy, (Ben) Franklin, to doggie daycare and attempt a run. We get to the lake and again, I attempt some time to reflect and set my mind for the day. This time, I do better with the focusing. Once my shower and breakfast are complete, I start working at my computer. I pull up my blog, write a post and then dive into my inboxes. I’m also fussing a bit with my new blog design, and jumping in and out of Facebook and Twitter (it’s a bad habit).
Noon ➛
Hungry, I eat my lunch while diving through my favorite blogs. I then jump on three business consulting client calls. I help a photographer transition to her new business full-time, I help a jewelry designer edit her collection, and I help a graphic designer decide whether it is time to take on a full-time employee. The sessions take up most of the afternoon, but I still get some time to pop back into my inbox and check email and wrap things up for the day.
Night ➛
When my husband comes home from work, we discuss the meal plan. As usual, I’m more interested in eating nachos at my favorite local Mexican restaurant than I am in eating the healthy salmon we had planned to eat that night. After a little convincing on the way to pick up the puppy from daycare, I win the dinner debate. I change my outfit (twice) due to the unusually cool temperatures and we head over to the restaurant. After we get leave the restaurant we head over to the Home Depot nearby to grab a saw blade for a patio garden table project. I may or may not have asked a Home Depot employee to help my husband find the right blade without mentioning that he was sent to help. We went back to the apartment with saw blade acquired and watched two episodes of our “newest” favorite, The Dick Van Dyke Show on Hulu. We then head to bed and Mr. Lively reads The Alchemist aloud for a little bit before I fall asleep around 10:30.


Three Last Things…
1. What’s up with your ability to smile that big in every photo, but never look cheesy? Seriously, a true skill.
Hah! The truth is, I’ve found that I have about one to two looks max that I can do - that smile at the camera being one of them. In my high school graduation pictures I tried to look ‘serious’ and ended up looking constipated in most of the photos. At that point I learned it’s best that I look at the camera and smile.
2. You coach and consult entrepreneurs for a living. But what happens when the coach needs coaching? Who helps you? Or do you feel like you have to figure it all out by yourself? Is that a challenge?
For sure! I have a mentor who I meet with monthly who is somewhat of a Grandfather/Vice Chairman of the Board. He and I meet for an hour and I tell him what I’m doing, he gives me suggestions, and we debate my next moves with a ‘lively’ conversation. It has been invaluable to have him in my corner. Recently, I also added another member to my support “team.” She is part massage therapist, spiritual guide, and confidant. Not exactly a life coach, but she helps me keep my actions based on my intuition. So no, though it can feel isolating to be working solo for my whole career, the help of these two people above and a (constant) dialogue with my husband about the ins and outs of the business, I feel like I’ve been able to manage the process pretty well.
3. Meditation, reflecting, resetting your mind for the day…some days it feels impossible. What are three tips you use to use to do this successfully and not feel frustrated? 
It totally can feel hard to do! I have found the following things helpful: (1) Get a partner. I’m lucky that my husband is also spending time in the morning setting his mind in his own ways as well. Before, I used to try to do some of these things alone and it felt so much harder to do so while he was sleeping next to me. If a significant other isn’t an option, a friend might be helpful to check in with on a regular basis. (2) Switch it up. I don’t have a strict mandate that I have to do ‘x, y, or z’ each day. Often, I get into a ritual about it, but the ritual is mostly centered on spending the time doing reflective things in my physical, mental, and spiritual life. (3) Don’t think “forever.” I started this process with the commitment to do it for just one week. That helped me shift my schedule without begrudging the heaviness of changing my old habits. Once I had a chance to get accustomed to the routine I found that I really enjoyed it and found it brought a lot more peace and balance into my life.


Jess lives in Chicago with her husband and dog (Ben) Franklin. She spends her days helping people design lives and businesses with intention through blogging, one-on-one consulting, and workshops. jesslivley.com with-intention.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:

Almond butter on some crackers (before run). English muffin with almond butter (after run). About six glasses of Lipton Iced Tea.


Lunch:

Mac and Cheese. A hefty portion of Comte cheese on crackers. Cherries.


Dinner:

Chips and salsa. Black bean nachos. House margarita with ice and salt.

Morning ➛

I woke up at 6am and read for about a half hour from Daring Greatly and a business book. Then, I spent some time reflecting on my day. The intention is to do this for about 15 minutes, but lately - like today - it’s more like five minutes. After the reading my husband and I walked our puppy, (Ben) Franklin, to doggie daycare and attempt a run. We get to the lake and again, I attempt some time to reflect and set my mind for the day. This time, I do better with the focusing. Once my shower and breakfast are complete, I start working at my computer. I pull up my blog, write a post and then dive into my inboxes. I’m also fussing a bit with my new blog design, and jumping in and out of Facebook and Twitter (it’s a bad habit).



Noon ➛

Hungry, I eat my lunch while diving through my favorite blogs. I then jump on three business consulting client calls. I help a photographer transition to her new business full-time, I help a jewelry designer edit her collection, and I help a graphic designer decide whether it is time to take on a full-time employee. The sessions take up most of the afternoon, but I still get some time to pop back into my inbox and check email and wrap things up for the day.



Night ➛

When my husband comes home from work, we discuss the meal plan. As usual, I’m more interested in eating nachos at my favorite local Mexican restaurant than I am in eating the healthy salmon we had planned to eat that night. After a little convincing on the way to pick up the puppy from daycare, I win the dinner debate. I change my outfit (twice) due to the unusually cool temperatures and we head over to the restaurant. After we get leave the restaurant we head over to the Home Depot nearby to grab a saw blade for a patio garden table project. I may or may not have asked a Home Depot employee to help my husband find the right blade without mentioning that he was sent to help. We went back to the apartment with saw blade acquired and watched two episodes of our “newest” favorite, The Dick Van Dyke Show on Hulu. We then head to bed and Mr. Lively reads The Alchemist aloud for a little bit before I fall asleep around 10:30.

Three Last Things…

1. What’s up with your ability to smile that big in every photo, but never look cheesy? Seriously, a true skill.

Hah! The truth is, I’ve found that I have about one to two looks max that I can do - that smile at the camera being one of them. In my high school graduation pictures I tried to look ‘serious’ and ended up looking constipated in most of the photos. At that point I learned it’s best that I look at the camera and smile.

2. You coach and consult entrepreneurs for a living. But what happens when the coach needs coaching? Who helps you? Or do you feel like you have to figure it all out by yourself? Is that a challenge?

For sure! I have a mentor who I meet with monthly who is somewhat of a Grandfather/Vice Chairman of the Board. He and I meet for an hour and I tell him what I’m doing, he gives me suggestions, and we debate my next moves with a ‘lively’ conversation. It has been invaluable to have him in my corner. Recently, I also added another member to my support “team.” She is part massage therapist, spiritual guide, and confidant. Not exactly a life coach, but she helps me keep my actions based on my intuition. So no, though it can feel isolating to be working solo for my whole career, the help of these two people above and a (constant) dialogue with my husband about the ins and outs of the business, I feel like I’ve been able to manage the process pretty well.

3. Meditation, reflecting, resetting your mind for the day…some days it feels impossible. What are three tips you use to use to do this successfully and not feel frustrated? 

It totally can feel hard to do! I have found the following things helpful: (1) Get a partner. I’m lucky that my husband is also spending time in the morning setting his mind in his own ways as well. Before, I used to try to do some of these things alone and it felt so much harder to do so while he was sleeping next to me. If a significant other isn’t an option, a friend might be helpful to check in with on a regular basis. (2) Switch it up. I don’t have a strict mandate that I have to do ‘x, y, or z’ each day. Often, I get into a ritual about it, but the ritual is mostly centered on spending the time doing reflective things in my physical, mental, and spiritual life. (3) Don’t think “forever.” I started this process with the commitment to do it for just one week. That helped me shift my schedule without begrudging the heaviness of changing my old habits. Once I had a chance to get accustomed to the routine I found that I really enjoyed it and found it brought a lot more peace and balance into my life.

Jess lives in Chicago with her husband and dog (Ben) Franklin. She spends her days helping people design lives and businesses with intention through blogging, one-on-one consulting, and workshops. jesslivley.com with-intention.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:
Shake with frozen blueberries, a banana, water and a scoop of The Ultimate Meal. Two cups of Ipsento’s Kenyan roast.
Lunch:
Cuban sandwich on sweet bread with plantain chips at 90 Miles. Iced tea.
Dinner:
Coriander roasted prawns and kohlrabi som tum, with pink grapefruit and herbs at Trencherman. 3 Floyds, Mikkeller, and Off Colors Beer Geek Mus (a 3.5% Russian Imperial Stout). Summer sausage sandwich and some slices of ham.


Morning ➛
It’s Thursday, I’m up at my usual 6am to start the pot of decaf coffee for Hillary and import photos from the last shoot. I spent the evening at The Beer Temple documenting and participating in a sour mixing class. So this morning, I’m revisiting what I captured and starting to write about the experience for my site, Good Beer Hunting. We’re in the middle of Chicago Craft Beer Week, so it’s been like this for days. John Barley of Solemn Oath Brewery texts me a few more versions of an opening line for a TEDx speech I’m helping him write about craft beer culture. John andy I are both early-morning thinkers, so it typically starts like this around 7am, and always over text. This morning, I have to load up for a shoot at DryHop Brewers, a new brewpub opening in Lakeview in mid-June. Batteries charged, lenses packed, flash cards emptied. Time to roll. But this time, I also have to put on my “TV shirt” because a film crew from Michigan is driving down to meet me and grab some footage for their documentary MI Beer Film. After they capture me capturing the DryHop “mash in” process (when they make the giant vat of oatmeal that becomes the sugary water that yeast turn into beer), we head back to my studio and set up to shoot some more footage there. We’re announcing the official launch date for the brewery this morning and people will be waking up to this exciting news.
Noon ➛
I say goodbye to the film crew, hop in the car again and head to lunch. Today I’m meeting a brewery owner to talk about a project for his new space. We’re looking to turn an entire wall into a photo story about the ingredients and process of beer making, including hop fields, grain malsters and the likes. Right after, I head to a freelance gig at a friend’s design firm. I’m helping them develop a brand and product portfolio strategy for an office supply manufacturer. This is the kind of work I’ve done for over six years as an innovation consultant, but only recently have I left the day job and started doing freelance. Their office space is one of Chicago’s last remaining bath houses converted into a massive house, and then used for a design space. Oh, the natural light here is amazing. After getting together a “sharpie deck”, we take a break from the work and I respond to emails. Ed Marszewski is calling me “cholo” to get my attention and asking for hi-res images for Mash Tun, his craft beer journal. Twice a year I unlock my Flickr account and let Ed and his design team loot the place for an hour, grabbing any images they want for the layout and design of the journal. By two, Ed has what he needs and I lock the account again. In a month, I’ll see what they took when a box of the journals show up at my door to sell on my site.
Night ➛
Tonight I shoot a Chicago Craft Beer week story from another angle, the kitchen. Trenchermen is partnering up with breweries for a beer pairing menu by Chef Patrick Sheenin. Mikkeller, 3 Floyds and Off Color are providing a few beers each for the event. My goal is always to put people at ease around the camera and establish my reason for being. “I’m going to be in your way all night. It’ll be a little annoying, but I promise, if you say move, I’ll move.” After explaining how much I love the kitchen, and that I’ve worked in a number of them growing up, the staff loosen, smile, and start making fun of each other like I was never there. Jackpot. All night I float between the kitchen and the bar. I chatted up Ria, the beer buyer for Trenchermen and Bangers & Lace. I got her backstory on being a homebrewer and how she stumbled in to the beer businesses with nothing more than a great palate and enough naivety to endear herself to the reps at Windy City who helped her build two of the cities’ best beer menus. I watch as patrons’ hands grasp a tulip glass and ready myself for a shot of them sipping a beer that inevitably comes about three seconds later. And I eat. I eat whatever the chef puts in front of me. I’m home by 11pm, exhausted but full of stories to tell Hillary. We both chat, let the cats burrow in to the blankets, and catch up on Instagram. Just before lights out, tell Hillary, “before you leave for work tomorrow, I need to get the keys out of the car in the garage. I locked them in again.” Eyes closed and with a smile, “you’re impossible,” she says.


Three Last Things…
1. What’s up with that beer on your bed. The label is pretty
It’s actually not a beer at all, it’s a cider. It’s a naturally fermented cider from the Basque region of Spain that’s bottled still (no carbonation) so it drinks more like a tart, farm-yardy juice. Saison beers are my favorite style with their funky, wild fermentation style, and these ciders are in a similar vein. My favorite cider maker friend, Ryan from Virtue Cider, also makes this style, and he always hands me a glass and says “here, this is great, it smells like a horse’s ass.”
2. How did you go from being just a dude that knew a whole bunch of nerdy facts about beer to being a major expert on the topic?
I’ve always believed that a real expert is someone who can translate those nerdy facts into a point of view, or guidance for a casual, but curious audience. So I do a ton of work and research to further my own knowledge — I take classes, reside in breweries for days on end, homebrew with more knowledgable friends, and drink…a lot. But what does all that knowledge mean if you can help others along on their own journey? I think it’s my ability and desire to connect with new people through beer that make Good Beer Hunting such a unique and sought-after publication. And of course, I try to make it look and feel as inspiring as it is to me and that connects with audiences at every level. No one cares that I went to such-and-such brewery and tried such-and-such beer. They want to feel it and re-live it themselves.
3. So, it’s the morning and you need to get your keys out of the car. Did you A. Grab a coat hanger and do it DIY or B. Call a locksmith?
I either wake Hillary up and borrow her keys to get into the garage. Or, if I’m ashamed of a particularly forgetful week, I wait for the upstairs neighbor to go to work and open the garage himself. He knows the drill.


Michael lives in Chicago with his wife Hillary Schuster and their two cats Tony and Duck. He is the writer and photographer behind Good Beer Hunting, a site devoted to the story of craft beer from around the world. goodbeerhunting.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:

Shake with frozen blueberries, a banana, water and a scoop of The Ultimate Meal. Two cups of Ipsento’s Kenyan roast.


Lunch:

Cuban sandwich on sweet bread with plantain chips at 90 Miles. Iced tea.


Dinner:

Coriander roasted prawns and kohlrabi som tum, with pink grapefruit and herbs at Trencherman. 3 Floyds, Mikkeller, and Off Colors Beer Geek Mus (a 3.5% Russian Imperial Stout). Summer sausage sandwich and some slices of ham.

Morning ➛

It’s Thursday, I’m up at my usual 6am to start the pot of decaf coffee for Hillary and import photos from the last shoot. I spent the evening at The Beer Temple documenting and participating in a sour mixing class. So this morning, I’m revisiting what I captured and starting to write about the experience for my site, Good Beer Hunting. We’re in the middle of Chicago Craft Beer Week, so it’s been like this for days. John Barley of Solemn Oath Brewery texts me a few more versions of an opening line for a TEDx speech I’m helping him write about craft beer culture. John andy I are both early-morning thinkers, so it typically starts like this around 7am, and always over text. This morning, I have to load up for a shoot at DryHop Brewers, a new brewpub opening in Lakeview in mid-June. Batteries charged, lenses packed, flash cards emptied. Time to roll. But this time, I also have to put on my “TV shirt” because a film crew from Michigan is driving down to meet me and grab some footage for their documentary MI Beer Film. After they capture me capturing the DryHop “mash in” process (when they make the giant vat of oatmeal that becomes the sugary water that yeast turn into beer), we head back to my studio and set up to shoot some more footage there. We’re announcing the official launch date for the brewery this morning and people will be waking up to this exciting news.



Noon ➛

I say goodbye to the film crew, hop in the car again and head to lunch. Today I’m meeting a brewery owner to talk about a project for his new space. We’re looking to turn an entire wall into a photo story about the ingredients and process of beer making, including hop fields, grain malsters and the likes. Right after, I head to a freelance gig at a friend’s design firm. I’m helping them develop a brand and product portfolio strategy for an office supply manufacturer. This is the kind of work I’ve done for over six years as an innovation consultant, but only recently have I left the day job and started doing freelance. Their office space is one of Chicago’s last remaining bath houses converted into a massive house, and then used for a design space. Oh, the natural light here is amazing. After getting together a “sharpie deck”, we take a break from the work and I respond to emails. Ed Marszewski is calling me “cholo” to get my attention and asking for hi-res images for Mash Tun, his craft beer journal. Twice a year I unlock my Flickr account and let Ed and his design team loot the place for an hour, grabbing any images they want for the layout and design of the journal. By two, Ed has what he needs and I lock the account again. In a month, I’ll see what they took when a box of the journals show up at my door to sell on my site.



Night ➛

Tonight I shoot a Chicago Craft Beer week story from another angle, the kitchen. Trenchermen is partnering up with breweries for a beer pairing menu by Chef Patrick Sheenin. Mikkeller, 3 Floyds and Off Color are providing a few beers each for the event. My goal is always to put people at ease around the camera and establish my reason for being. “I’m going to be in your way all night. It’ll be a little annoying, but I promise, if you say move, I’ll move.” After explaining how much I love the kitchen, and that I’ve worked in a number of them growing up, the staff loosen, smile, and start making fun of each other like I was never there. Jackpot. All night I float between the kitchen and the bar. I chatted up Ria, the beer buyer for Trenchermen and Bangers & Lace. I got her backstory on being a homebrewer and how she stumbled in to the beer businesses with nothing more than a great palate and enough naivety to endear herself to the reps at Windy City who helped her build two of the cities’ best beer menus. I watch as patrons’ hands grasp a tulip glass and ready myself for a shot of them sipping a beer that inevitably comes about three seconds later. And I eat. I eat whatever the chef puts in front of me. I’m home by 11pm, exhausted but full of stories to tell Hillary. We both chat, let the cats burrow in to the blankets, and catch up on Instagram. Just before lights out, tell Hillary, “before you leave for work tomorrow, I need to get the keys out of the car in the garage. I locked them in again.” Eyes closed and with a smile, “you’re impossible,” she says.

Three Last Things…

1. What’s up with that beer on your bed. The label is pretty

It’s actually not a beer at all, it’s a cider. It’s a naturally fermented cider from the Basque region of Spain that’s bottled still (no carbonation) so it drinks more like a tart, farm-yardy juice. Saison beers are my favorite style with their funky, wild fermentation style, and these ciders are in a similar vein. My favorite cider maker friend, Ryan from Virtue Cider, also makes this style, and he always hands me a glass and says “here, this is great, it smells like a horse’s ass.”

2. How did you go from being just a dude that knew a whole bunch of nerdy facts about beer to being a major expert on the topic?

I’ve always believed that a real expert is someone who can translate those nerdy facts into a point of view, or guidance for a casual, but curious audience. So I do a ton of work and research to further my own knowledge — I take classes, reside in breweries for days on end, homebrew with more knowledgable friends, and drink…a lot. But what does all that knowledge mean if you can help others along on their own journey? I think it’s my ability and desire to connect with new people through beer that make Good Beer Hunting such a unique and sought-after publication. And of course, I try to make it look and feel as inspiring as it is to me and that connects with audiences at every level. No one cares that I went to such-and-such brewery and tried such-and-such beer. They want to feel it and re-live it themselves.

3. So, it’s the morning and you need to get your keys out of the car. Did you A. Grab a coat hanger and do it DIY or B. Call a locksmith?

I either wake Hillary up and borrow her keys to get into the garage. Or, if I’m ashamed of a particularly forgetful week, I wait for the upstairs neighbor to go to work and open the garage himself. He knows the drill.

Michael lives in Chicago with his wife Hillary Schuster and their two cats Tony and Duck. He is the writer and photographer behind Good Beer Hunting, a site devoted to the story of craft beer from around the world. goodbeerhunting.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:
Oatmeal with whiskey. Iced tea.
Lunch:
Salad. Pizza (sausage and jalapeno!).
Dinner:
Shaved vegetable salad with homemade ranch dressing. Malted ice cream with almond crunch.


Morning ➛
It is the weekend, so we sleep later than usual (which isn’t very late—we’re up by 8am). I make some oatmeal while cleaning up the kitchen. Bryan (my partner) is in the other room exercising. I eat at my computer while checking email and getting lost in the internet. Have you seen a slow loris? Sensitive plants are so cool! I want to go to Portugal. I also spend a good amount of time researching Neko Case, in part for fun, in part for a project I am working on. She’s a good writer. But enough with the internet! I force myself to shower and get ready for the day. As I am getting dressed, I realize my closet is a mess and decide to deal with it by pulling a bunch of clothes out and piling them on the floor, at which point I decide I need to get out of the house. The clothes remain on the floor.
Noon ➛
Bryan and I go into the city to meet our friends Katie and Justin for lunch. Katie has been my best friend for forever and is due to have a baby any minute now, so we’re all anxiously awaiting his arrival. After lunch we walk over to Sprout Home, my favorite plant shop. Katie and Justin pick up some herbs for their kitchen, and we find a quirky little fern to add to the gang of plants in our sun room. We give Katie and Justin big hugs, knowing that the next time we see them they’ll likely be three instead of two. Bryan and I take our time strolling back through the west side of the city to the train. It is hard to resist these first days of spring, I want to be wandering outdoors all of the time. We spend a few minutes admiring the skyline from the Ashland green line platform bridge (which is our favorite view of Chicago) before hoping on the train headed west.
Night ➛
We get off of the train a stop early to get some groceries. Sometimes I feel like I spend most of my life at the grocery store. We impulse buy a lot of gum at the register. When we get home, I photograph some malted ice cream and almond croquant that I plan to write about on my blog. It’s delicious. I spend the early evening getting a little more work done, editing some photos, and writing a bit. For dinner, I throw together a salad using some homemade ranch dressing that I had invented the night before. It is tangy—I can’t decide if it is too tangy. We eat the ice cream for dessert. Bryan practices guitar, and I do some cookbook research. We meet up on the couch to watch The Inbetweeners Movie, which we thoroughly enjoy, though not as much as the series. I get into bed and flip through some recently acquired cookbooks (one of the benefits/curses of food blogging is that you get a lot of cookbooks) before switching over to George Saunder’s Tenth of December until it is time to sleep. I dream of Nicki Minaj, a 90s color-block production of Romeo and Juliet, and friendly zombies.


Three Last Things…
1. What’s up with the whiskey in your oatmeal?
Bryan and I spent part of our honeymoon at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. It is an incredible hotel in a gorgeous part of England. For breakfast they served porridge with an optional shot of whiskey added. It blew my mind. I like it best with Drambuie, which is an herb and honey infused malt whiskey. Drambuie isn’t very fashionable these days, but I am obsessed with the flavor. It also pairs really well with strawberries. Anyway, make oatmeal and add 1-2 tablespoons of Drambuie (or bourbon) and a little brown sugar—The Best. Also, you get to tell people you take whiskey in your oatmeal, which is nice and provocative.
2. Your site is one of the biggest cooking sites out there, you’re a food writer, and you go to bed reading cookbooks. Have you found a way to separate your real life from your blog life? Can you enjoy a meal without thinking about it as content?
Yeah, this is something that I am careful about. It is important to me that the writing I do about food does not get in the way of my enjoyment of food, or in the way of my life more generally. I almost never take process photos of cooking, because I don’t like interrupting the experience of preparing food. I also rarely make anything specifically to write about. I basically go about my normal life and cook the food I am interested in and curious about. If I like what I made, I snap a few photos. It is all pretty casual. It means that I only post on my blog occasionally, but you know that I really like what I do choose to share. I have always told myself that if the blog ever starts to feel like work it is time to stop. I still love it, so no end in sight! It is also important to note that I care about other stuff. My background is in art and design, I have a bunch of interests and food is just the one I am choosing to share with the internet. The term “foodie” bothers me, not because it is a stupid word, but because it is so reductive. Who cares about food if you don’t have art and love and nature?!
3. What the hell is a slow loris?
OMG! They are this amazing animal that is especially cute when eating a rice ball. I love how persecuted they look! Slow Loris Video


Tim lives in Oak Park, Illinois, with his partner, Bryan. He is a food writer, stylist, photographer, and creator of the award-winning blog, Lottie + Doof. lottieanddoof.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:

Oatmeal with whiskey. Iced tea.


Lunch:

Salad. Pizza (sausage and jalapeno!).


Dinner:

Shaved vegetable salad with homemade ranch dressing. Malted ice cream with almond crunch.

Morning ➛

It is the weekend, so we sleep later than usual (which isn’t very late—we’re up by 8am). I make some oatmeal while cleaning up the kitchen. Bryan (my partner) is in the other room exercising. I eat at my computer while checking email and getting lost in the internet. Have you seen a slow loris? Sensitive plants are so cool! I want to go to Portugal. I also spend a good amount of time researching Neko Case, in part for fun, in part for a project I am working on. She’s a good writer. But enough with the internet! I force myself to shower and get ready for the day. As I am getting dressed, I realize my closet is a mess and decide to deal with it by pulling a bunch of clothes out and piling them on the floor, at which point I decide I need to get out of the house. The clothes remain on the floor.



Noon ➛

Bryan and I go into the city to meet our friends Katie and Justin for lunch. Katie has been my best friend for forever and is due to have a baby any minute now, so we’re all anxiously awaiting his arrival. After lunch we walk over to Sprout Home, my favorite plant shop. Katie and Justin pick up some herbs for their kitchen, and we find a quirky little fern to add to the gang of plants in our sun room. We give Katie and Justin big hugs, knowing that the next time we see them they’ll likely be three instead of two. Bryan and I take our time strolling back through the west side of the city to the train. It is hard to resist these first days of spring, I want to be wandering outdoors all of the time. We spend a few minutes admiring the skyline from the Ashland green line platform bridge (which is our favorite view of Chicago) before hoping on the train headed west.



Night ➛

We get off of the train a stop early to get some groceries. Sometimes I feel like I spend most of my life at the grocery store. We impulse buy a lot of gum at the register. When we get home, I photograph some malted ice cream and almond croquant that I plan to write about on my blog. It’s delicious. I spend the early evening getting a little more work done, editing some photos, and writing a bit. For dinner, I throw together a salad using some homemade ranch dressing that I had invented the night before. It is tangy—I can’t decide if it is too tangy. We eat the ice cream for dessert. Bryan practices guitar, and I do some cookbook research. We meet up on the couch to watch The Inbetweeners Movie, which we thoroughly enjoy, though not as much as the series. I get into bed and flip through some recently acquired cookbooks (one of the benefits/curses of food blogging is that you get a lot of cookbooks) before switching over to George Saunder’s Tenth of December until it is time to sleep. I dream of Nicki Minaj, a 90s color-block production of Romeo and Juliet, and friendly zombies.

Three Last Things…

1. What’s up with the whiskey in your oatmeal?

Bryan and I spent part of our honeymoon at Barnsley House in the Cotswolds. It is an incredible hotel in a gorgeous part of England. For breakfast they served porridge with an optional shot of whiskey added. It blew my mind. I like it best with Drambuie, which is an herb and honey infused malt whiskey. Drambuie isn’t very fashionable these days, but I am obsessed with the flavor. It also pairs really well with strawberries. Anyway, make oatmeal and add 1-2 tablespoons of Drambuie (or bourbon) and a little brown sugar—The Best. Also, you get to tell people you take whiskey in your oatmeal, which is nice and provocative.

2. Your site is one of the biggest cooking sites out there, you’re a food writer, and you go to bed reading cookbooks. Have you found a way to separate your real life from your blog life? Can you enjoy a meal without thinking about it as content?

Yeah, this is something that I am careful about. It is important to me that the writing I do about food does not get in the way of my enjoyment of food, or in the way of my life more generally. I almost never take process photos of cooking, because I don’t like interrupting the experience of preparing food. I also rarely make anything specifically to write about. I basically go about my normal life and cook the food I am interested in and curious about. If I like what I made, I snap a few photos. It is all pretty casual. It means that I only post on my blog occasionally, but you know that I really like what I do choose to share. I have always told myself that if the blog ever starts to feel like work it is time to stop. I still love it, so no end in sight! It is also important to note that I care about other stuff. My background is in art and design, I have a bunch of interests and food is just the one I am choosing to share with the internet. The term “foodie” bothers me, not because it is a stupid word, but because it is so reductive. Who cares about food if you don’t have art and love and nature?!

3. What the hell is a slow loris?

OMG! They are this amazing animal that is especially cute when eating a rice ball. I love how persecuted they look! Slow Loris Video

Tim lives in Oak Park, Illinois, with his partner, Bryan. He is a food writer, stylist, photographer, and creator of the award-winning blog, Lottie + Doof. lottieanddoof.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:
Spinach, goat cheese, and red pepper egg white omelette. Rye toast with cream cheese & hot sauce. Sliced apples with cinnamon.
Lunch:
Peppered turkey & hard salami with swiss cheese, spinach, and yellow mustard on rye. Carrots and chipotle hummus.
Dinner:
Parmesan chicken sausage with garlic grilled green and yellow peppers in vodka sauce.


Morning ➛
6am wake-up alarm went off, the lady hit snooze twice. Get out of bed, somehow. Go for a quick half hour run around the Logan Square boulevard and jump in the shower. Pull Frannie (the pooch) and out bed and take her down to do her business while the lady makes breakfast. Freakin’ delicious. Feed the pooch and gave her a good belly scrathin’, she was still sleeping basically. Scooter off to MAKE. and grab coffee on the way. Iced coffee all day, errryday. Process email for an hour.
Noon ➛
Got right to work on art direction and concepts for an identity and branding project. The client, an electronic medical records company, is a bit on the ‘corporate’ side for what we normally do, but we took on the project because they wanted to interject some personality and higher-end design into the brand. Break for lunch. Check a few blogs and social media thing-a-ma-bobs; tumblr, twitter, dribbble, etc… After lunch I get sort of sleepy from that turkey and need to take a quick break from the studio, so I scooter down the street to get another iced coffee. Do the requested edits on a packaging design project. Some of the textures that we integrated into the design needed to be updated, so I actually get to get my hands dirty in the studio for a second. Scan, scan, scan. Luckily we have worked with this client for a long time, so it actually went quite swiftly. Done for the day. Scooter home.
Night ➛
Get home to snoring bulldog, she sleeps a lot. Take her down to do the dance, again. Get started making dinner with the lady. Take the usual after-dinner walk down to the Logan Square dog park. Frannie finally comes alive, she always loves hamming it up for the people we pass on the way and at the park. She didn’t pay much attention to the other dogs though. I don’t think she knows she is a dog. Get back to The Bungalow (that’s what I call our little apartment) and settle in for the night. The lady turns on some trashy TV show, Gossip Girl I think. I can’t watch that stuff, so I open up the laptop and tinker with a personal project of mine called Athlete Objects. I whip out the start of the ‘Berry Sanders’ character illustration. Head off to bed. Check a few tweets and FB for a bit to numb my mind before bed. The lady (as usually) is out cold as soon as her head hits the bed. Frannie is snoring hard bed side, puts me right to sleep. Zzzzzzzz. 


Three Last Things…
1. What’s up with this “lady” you keep referring to? Are you living with British royalty?
Not British, but close. She is very Irish. The ‘lady’ is my lady, Ms. Abby Wynne. She is the ‘other half’ of MAKE. and parent of Frannie (who I sometimes call little lady, confusing I know).
2. Your Athlete Objects site is faaantastic (Bird and Malone are great). How did you get linked up with ESPN?
Why thank you, glad you like it. It is a personal project that I have been tinkering around with for a couple years. It has started to get some press as of late, ESPN even commissioned a couple character illustrations.
3. Paul Rand once said, “It is important to use your hands, this is what distinguishes you from a cow or computer operator.” Do you think this applies to design and illustration today?
Absolutely. Developing your hand-skills in super important. Computers are cool, but they should just be one tool in your tool belt.


Jesse lives in Chicago where he co-owns & operates MAKE., a Chicago-based design team, with Abby Wynne. readysetmake.com  athleteobjects.com

So, How Was Your Day?

Breakfast:

Spinach, goat cheese, and red pepper egg white omelette. Rye toast with cream cheese & hot sauce. Sliced apples with cinnamon.


Lunch:

Peppered turkey & hard salami with swiss cheese, spinach, and yellow mustard on rye. Carrots and chipotle hummus.


Dinner:

Parmesan chicken sausage with garlic grilled green and yellow peppers in vodka sauce.

Morning ➛

6am wake-up alarm went off, the lady hit snooze twice. Get out of bed, somehow. Go for a quick half hour run around the Logan Square boulevard and jump in the shower. Pull Frannie (the pooch) and out bed and take her down to do her business while the lady makes breakfast. Freakin’ delicious. Feed the pooch and gave her a good belly scrathin’, she was still sleeping basically. Scooter off to MAKE. and grab coffee on the way. Iced coffee all day, errryday. Process email for an hour.



Noon ➛

Got right to work on art direction and concepts for an identity and branding project. The client, an electronic medical records company, is a bit on the ‘corporate’ side for what we normally do, but we took on the project because they wanted to interject some personality and higher-end design into the brand. Break for lunch. Check a few blogs and social media thing-a-ma-bobs; tumblr, twitter, dribbble, etc… After lunch I get sort of sleepy from that turkey and need to take a quick break from the studio, so I scooter down the street to get another iced coffee. Do the requested edits on a packaging design project. Some of the textures that we integrated into the design needed to be updated, so I actually get to get my hands dirty in the studio for a second. Scan, scan, scan. Luckily we have worked with this client for a long time, so it actually went quite swiftly. Done for the day. Scooter home.



Night ➛

Get home to snoring bulldog, she sleeps a lot. Take her down to do the dance, again. Get started making dinner with the lady. Take the usual after-dinner walk down to the Logan Square dog park. Frannie finally comes alive, she always loves hamming it up for the people we pass on the way and at the park. She didn’t pay much attention to the other dogs though. I don’t think she knows she is a dog. Get back to The Bungalow (that’s what I call our little apartment) and settle in for the night. The lady turns on some trashy TV show, Gossip Girl I think. I can’t watch that stuff, so I open up the laptop and tinker with a personal project of mine called Athlete Objects. I whip out the start of the ‘Berry Sanders’ character illustration. Head off to bed. Check a few tweets and FB for a bit to numb my mind before bed. The lady (as usually) is out cold as soon as her head hits the bed. Frannie is snoring hard bed side, puts me right to sleep. Zzzzzzzz. 

Three Last Things…

1. What’s up with this “lady” you keep referring to? Are you living with British royalty?

Not British, but close. She is very Irish. The ‘lady’ is my lady, Ms. Abby Wynne. She is the ‘other half’ of MAKE. and parent of Frannie (who I sometimes call little lady, confusing I know).

2. Your Athlete Objects site is faaantastic (Bird and Malone are great). How did you get linked up with ESPN?

Why thank you, glad you like it. It is a personal project that I have been tinkering around with for a couple years. It has started to get some press as of late, ESPN even commissioned a couple character illustrations.

3. Paul Rand once said, “It is important to use your hands, this is what distinguishes you from a cow or computer operator.” Do you think this applies to design and illustration today?

Absolutely. Developing your hand-skills in super important. Computers are cool, but they should just be one tool in your tool belt.

Jesse lives in Chicago where he co-owns & operates MAKE., a Chicago-based design team, with Abby Wynne. readysetmake.com  athleteobjects.com